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PKD: The Challenge of Uncertainty

“He may need another kidney someday, our children may need kidneys someday, but we’re just – we’re hopeful and positive that things will work out for us medically, spiritually, all around.”

Cara Ventresca

Transcript

I think the most challenging part about living with PKD in my life is knowing how it could affect my own children.  I have three daughters, they have not been tested, but just knowing that there’s a 50% chance that each one of them could get it, just kind of weighs a little heavily on my mind.

One question that I was asked several times during the evaluation for transplant process was if there’s a chance that your children would need a kidney, why would you donate to your husband and not wait for your – wait to donate one to your child.

His kidney may fail someday, the average lifespan of a transplanted kidney is probably about 20 years, he may need another kidney, our children may need kidneys someday, but we’re just – we’re hopeful and positive that things will work out for us medically, spiritually, all around.

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